rrrick:

Violent Femmes | Please Do Not Go

Reblogged from vintage vixen obsessed

brianmichaelbendis:

Alex Toth designs for the 1967 Hanna-Barbera Fantastic Four cartoon show; The Skrulls & The Super-Skrull,  The Watcher, Doctor Doom, Diablo & The Red Ghost. (From 1996’s Alex Toth: By Design, by the artist & Darrell McNeil.)

Reblogged from BENDIS!
blackpaint20:

Devious detail of Gustave Doré - The Vision of the Valley of the Dry Bones 

blackpaint20:

Devious detail of Gustave Doré - The Vision of the Valley of the Dry Bones 

ucresearch:

Welcome to the Electric Theatre
Made in 1901, Bob’s Electric Theatre is one of the earliest stop-motion films. It’s credited to Segundo de Chomon, who specialized in hand tinting his films — using a brush and stencils, frame by frame. 
From the video: Into the Archives of Animation →

ucresearch:

Welcome to the Electric Theatre

Made in 1901, Bob’s Electric Theatre is one of the earliest stop-motion films. It’s credited to Segundo de Chomon, who specialized in hand tinting his films — using a brush and stencils, frame by frame. 

From the video: Into the Archives of Animation

Reblogged from sloth unleashed
xenophone:

projecthabu:
F-1 rocket engine, Hancock County MS photo by Curt Mason

xenophone:

projecthabu:

F-1 rocket engine, Hancock County MS photo by Curt Mason

Reblogged from sloth unleashed

instagram:

Bringing Taxidermy Back to Life with @chipito

To see more of Chipito’s surrealist taxidermy scenes, follow @chipito.

"Bringing things that are not meant to be together into one image creates a new, disrupted story that hopefully inspires people," says Chipito (@chipito), the anonymous alter ego of two Belgian creative directors.

Chipito’s haunting, surreal photos bring together a love of photography, a desire to explore abandoned locations and a fascination with taxidermy that stretches back 25 years. “Our home is like a giant Wunderkammer,” Chipito explains. “It’s an inexhaustible source of inspiration.”

The jarring masked figures, says Chipito, are supposed to make the viewer feel a sense of unease. “We’ve always been passionate about controversy and curiosities, ” he says. “The ugliness is a reaction against the overdose of beauty in the media, and the masks against the voyeurism of social media and government surveillance.”

Reblogged from Digital Baubles
fuckyeahabandonedplaces:

The Forgotten Literature (by Explore The forgotten)

fuckyeahabandonedplaces:

The Forgotten Literature (by Explore The forgotten)

70sscifiart:

Soviet sci-fi

70sscifiart:

Soviet sci-fi

Reblogged from vintage vixen obsessed

666jss said: Can you put out a firmly worded memo to your writing colleagues to stop using the description "Strong as a hulk"? its friggin lame man, all these things are strong as a hulk? Wendigos and what not are strong as a Hulk? No they aint! HULKS are strong as HULKS and HULKS are the strongest there is, and when theyre not, they got mad and when they get mad THEY (HE) GETS STRONGER. Everybodys trying to nerf the Hulk to make theyre lame enemies look touger. Chill out. friggin wendigos my ass.

brianmichaelbendis:

image

image

el.  oh.  EL.  : )

Reblogged from BENDIS!
ianference:

The basement under the wards of Worcester State Hospital, an 1870s asylum in Massachusetts, was about the creepiest place I’ve ever poked my flashlight into.  Pitch-black, with heavy boards covering all the windows, the first thing one would see when shining a torch into the building after sliding down a collapsed staircase was a mummified dog.  There were strange, experimental hydrotherapy devices and a scale in a climate-controlled room to weigh patients while doctors performed obscure procedures on them.  But imagine my surprise when, in 2006, I rounded a bend to a stairwell and found these mannequin legs standing upright against the rusticated stone wall.  I nearly leapt out of my boots.  Every trip in there was accompanied by a strange feeling of dread, until the wards were torn down entirely in 2008.

ianference:

The basement under the wards of Worcester State Hospital, an 1870s asylum in Massachusetts, was about the creepiest place I’ve ever poked my flashlight into.  Pitch-black, with heavy boards covering all the windows, the first thing one would see when shining a torch into the building after sliding down a collapsed staircase was a mummified dog.  There were strange, experimental hydrotherapy devices and a scale in a climate-controlled room to weigh patients while doctors performed obscure procedures on them.  But imagine my surprise when, in 2006, I rounded a bend to a stairwell and found these mannequin legs standing upright against the rusticated stone wall.  I nearly leapt out of my boots.  Every trip in there was accompanied by a strange feeling of dread, until the wards were torn down entirely in 2008.

livelymorgue:

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Reblogged from The Lively Morgue
apanelofanalysts:

Alice Cooper with wife and daughter

apanelofanalysts:

Alice Cooper with wife and daughter

Reblogged from 2headedsnake
shadesandshadows:

 Ein Totentanz Moderner  (Dance of Death, Modern) by Joseph Sattler, German, 1855-1931.
 Illustration for the 1912 Berlin edition and scanned at the Heinrich Heine Universität in Düsseldorf, Germany; owned by the Public Library of Cincinnati, Hamilton County. Ohio, USA. 

shadesandshadows:

 Ein Totentanz Moderner  (Dance of Death, Modern) by Joseph Sattler, German, 1855-1931.

 Illustration for the 1912 Berlin edition and scanned at the Heinrich Heine Universität in Düsseldorf, Germany; owned by the Public Library of Cincinnati, Hamilton County. Ohio, USA. 

Reblogged from Librarienne